6
Oct 2020

Op-Ed: Interdisciplinarity

Information is worth nothing unless organized. Everything else is noise. Modern medical treatment of chronic and civilization disease suffers two major drawbacks. First, it only looks at symptoms and prescribes anti-medication. And secondly, the various specialists working for you on your health are not talking to each other. Big egos often times stand in the way of real treatments. Why listen to us? We are just "fitness trainers", right? Read my opinions here...
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Posted by 
Julian Massler
In 
Wellbeing
 Category
28
Sep 2020

Cardiovascular diseases: How does strength training improve heart health?

Various risk factors contribute to diseases of the cardiovascular system. These include high blood pressure, diabetes, elevated cholesterol levels and overweight. The usual suspects of the affluent modern society. We spoke about heart health to Anna Maria Schürner, a leading physician for cardiac anesthesia and intensive care medicine. Anna Maria came to her AURUM training after her night shift and three hours of sleep. She doesn't like to miss her training sessions. The heart doctor has been doing strength training since the age of 15.
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Posted by 
Egle Paulauskaite
In 
Wellbeing
 Category
26
Sep 2020

Why High Intensity Training works so good for fat loss and against health problems

Some minutes are longer than others. You don´t need to rewatch Interstellar to be reminded of that. A visit to one of our locations in Zürich, Zug, or St Gallen will give you a comprehensive experience of time dilation. Of course, I am not talking about the physical relativity of time, I am talking about the psychological relativity of how you spend your time. Many people think of our strength training method as a scam. But only until they experience the first minute. Let´s explore what happens during that one minute of intense muscle work...
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Posted by 
Julian Massler
In 
Fat Loss
 Category
14
Sep 2020

Op-Ed: The role of your genes in muscle & strength gains

I want to look like a swimmer, so I will go swimming. I want to look like Christiano Ronaldo, so I go and play soccer. I want to look like a runway model, so I walk the runway. The last one makes no sense, right? So why should the other two examples be any different? Humans love these straight forward heuristics. That's because our brain loves simple cause and effect relationships that don´t require thinking hard and in turn, don´t burn a lot of energy. Kahneman & Tversky received the Nobel Prize for that observation. Learn here why we suffer these cognitive biases when we think about fitness as well and how our genes determine our results from strength training.
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Posted by 
Julian Massler
In 
Muscle Gain
 Category